Watercoloring Techniques: Chalks and Markers

If you saw my last post, I started sharing some of the cards we are doing in my watercolor technique class (if you haven’t seen it, check it out here).  These cards are meant as a way to introduce you to some of the different ways you can play with watercolor styles.  So, last time was Inks and Watercolor Crayons; and so today is Chalks/Pastels and Markers.  If you have any questions, leave me a comment or send me a note and I’d be happy to help you out.

Watercoloring with Chalks

Stampin’ Pastels are the chalks offered by Stampin’ Up! and they used to come by default in your Stampin’ Up! starter kit.  So, I had a big set for ages but kept forgetting to pull it out.  But that is when a class like this is great, it reminded me of the different ways you can use your chalks, including watercoloring.  In this example, we did one of the easiest methods which is just to pick up the chalk using a blender pen and then coloring your image.  The nice thing with this method is that you can get a rich color without it being as streaky or dark like you might with a marker.  The difference is that you are essentially picking up the physical chalk with the pen and smoothing that out on your image as opposed to just having some of the ink pigment soaking into the tip of your pen like when you are using inks.

**If you are interested in chalks, there is a set in the Clearance Rack for a steal!  Its while supplies last so snag it while you can! **

This is only one of the ways to use chalks.  I have a blog post on other technique ideas for using your Stampin’ Pastels – check out more Pastel Techniques here.

Watercoloring with Markers

So, this is a technique I LOVE because it is sooo easy and turns out beautifully.  For this technique, all you are doing is using the Stampin’ Write markers to outline a stamped line art image.  Then pull the color from the outline to wherever you want there to be color fill.  So, in the image below, I outlined the flower head in Rich Razzleberry marker and then used a blender pen to pull the Razzleberry color to fill out the petals.  You want to use the brush head of the marker when drawing your outline so there is enough ink on the paper to blend around.  Also, this technique really works well if your marker is a dye based ink.

You can also use your markers to do watercoloring in other ways including using the marker to color onto a clear block, ink pad lid, etc and then picking up the color with your blender pen.  The one thing you do not want to do is to try to pick up the color off the tip of the marker using your blender pen.  If you do this, you may start diluting the color in your marker because you can have some of the water or alcohol base in your blender pen soak into the marker tip when you are trying to pull off color, which is no good.

Card 5
I’ll be back to post the last card at the end of the week.  Hope you stop back by to see!

Interested in trying these cards & techniques out yourself?

In Person
Do to multiple requests, I’m running my class again on March 28th in the Mountain View, CA area.  I’d love to have you join us. Check out the full details on my meetup site.

Online
Or, if you are not local, purchase the supplies for these techniques from my online store and send me an email.  I’ll send you written tutorial instructions for these cards for FREE!  Not sure what you need, email me at jennifer@nwstamper.com and I’ll send you a basic supply list and you can see what you have in your stash and what you would still need.

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